Water Snakes In Florida
85 / 100

There’s nothing more exciting than seeing water snakes in Florida. But we may not have to wait too much longer to get a glimpse of the said snake. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is conducting a water snake survey to figure out how many water snakes there are in the state. Experts think that there are only about 100,000 water snakes in the state, but they need your help to get a better estimate.

Snakes are an animal that strike fear in the hearts of many. They are often misunderstood and misrepresented in the media, and this is precisely what makes them so fascinating. That is why I decided to write this blog post. In it, I will spotlight 12 different types of water snakes in Florida, their habitats, and their characteristics.

Midland Water Snake In Florida

Scientific name of midland water snake: Nerodia sipedon pleuralis
Length: 24-30 inches
Venomous: No

Midland Water Snakes In Florida are usually around 24-30 inches (60-76 cm) in total length. They are light brown with dark brown or reddish-brown crossbands on the neck, which are often outlined in black. These crossbands turn into alternating blotches further down the body.

There are dark squarish markings on the sides of the body between the darker blotches that extend upwards from the belly. Juvenile coloration is similar to that described for adults in Midland Water Snakes in Florida, with the light brown coloration turning darker brown or black, and the crossbands on the neck may not be as noticeable.

Midland Water Snakes in Florida are not dangerous to humans or pets, although they will bite in self-defense. They are not typically aggressive, and will only bite in self-defense. This snake in Florida is Non-venomous. This snake is Non-venomous. These snakes are native to Florida.

Florida Banded Water Snake

Scientific name of Florida Banded Water Snake: Nerodia fasciata pictiventris
Length: 1.5 m
Venomous: No

The Banded Water snake is a nonvenomous, primarily aquatic snake endemic to the United States. Its hue is often gray, greenish-gray, or brown, with dark crossbanding. Many examples are so black in color that the patterning is challenging to see. They have flat heads and are relatively large in size.

These snakes are often found in slow-moving bodies of water such as rivers, lakes, and ponds. They eat a wide variety of fish and amphibians—water Snakes In Florida The Banded Water snake.

Water snakes with bands can be found in the Midwest and Southeast. They can be found from Indiana to Louisiana and from Florida to Florida. They can be found in most freshwater settings, including lakes, rivers, marshes, ponds, streams, and swamps. These snakes can be found in almost every freshwater setting in these states, including water snakes in Florida.

Plain-bellied Watersnake In Florida

Scientific name of Plain-bellied Watersnake: Nerodia erythrogaster
Length: 30 – 48 inches
Venomous: No

Northern water snakes are among the most prevalent in the United States, and the body of the reptiles can be various hues of gray, tan, buff, or brown, and juvenile snakes are frequently more colorful than adults.

When angry, they would flatten their bodies and bite. Water snakes grow to be between 2 and 4.5 feet (0.6 and 1.4 meters) long, with the majority being around 3.5 feet (1 meter) long. Water snakes in Florida are less common.

These snakes are common in the eastern portion of the United States, particularly in the Northeast and Midwest. They prefer a wide range of aquatic environments, including ponds, vernal pools (seasonal pools of water), and lakes.

Northern water snakes may be observed resting on rocks and prefer slow-moving or standing water near sunning areas, such as ponds, vernal pools (seasonal pools of water), and lakes. Water snakes in Florida may be observed sunning themselves on rocks, docks, and vegetation near lakes, ponds, and other aquatic environments.

The northern water snake eats a lot of fish and amphibians, devouring them whole. These snakes have been observed eating a variety of fish, including brook trout, sunfish, smallmouth bass, minnows, bullhead catfish, and hogsuckers.

They are most commonly found curled up and lounging in the sun in the summer months, but they have also been seen lounging on overhanging trees, pathways, and cattail stems. Only in the fall and spring are they gregarious. Water Snakes in Florida also like to lounge in the sun.

Southern Watersnake In Florida

Scientific name: Nerodia fasciata fasciata
Length: 22-42inches
Venomous: No

The average Southern Watersnake is 22-42 inches (56-107 cm) in length. They are stout-bodied snakes with broad black, brown, or red crossbands along the back (frequently edged with black). Tan, gray, or reddish are the lighter, thinner bands. A black strip in the middle of the back may be used to break up the light bands. Water Snakes in Florida are typically black, brown, or red with yellowish bands.

As the snake ages, the crossbands may get obliterated, and elderly individuals may become uniformly black. The backdrop might be gray, yellow, tan, or reddish in hue. From the eye to the angle of the jaw, a black line runs. The coloring of juveniles is comparable to that of adults. Water Snakes In Florida can be found throughout the state.

These Water Snakes in Florida may be found in every county on Florida’s mainland, although they are not present in the Florida Keys. Non-venomous, these snakes are not hazardous to humans or pets, and they will bite to protect themselves.

These Water Snakes in Florida are not aggressive and prefer not to come into direct contact with humans or pets. Almost the majority of bites occur when the snakes are purposely harmed.

Queen Snake In Florida

Scientific name of Queen Snake: Regina septemvittata
Length: 15 – 24 inches
Venomous: No

Queen snakes are typically 15-24 inches (38-61 cm) long, brownish to olive-green in color, with a yellowish or cream-colored stripe on the bottom part of the body. The cream-colored lip scales contrast strongly with the remainder of the brown head.

The body scales are dull and heavily keeled, and the juvenile coloration is similar to that of adults. Water snakes in Florida typically grow to be 24-41 inches (61-104 cm) long, are dark brown to black in color, and have a yellow or orange stripe on each side. The belly is gray, yellow, or orange with gray or black checkers.

From the Ochlockonee River basin west, queen snakes may be found in the Panhandle of Florida. Nonvenomous. Queen snakes are not hazardous to humans or animals, and they are found throughout the Panhandle.

Brown Watersnake In Florida

Scientific name: Nerodia taxispilota
Adult length: 30-60 inches
Venomous: No

The average adult Brown Watersnake measures 30-60 inches (76-152 cm) in length. The light tan snakes have squarish darker brown streaks down the center of their backs. Between the spots on the back, dark squarish marks stretch upwards from the abdomen onto the sides of their bodies.

The head is prominent and separate from the neck. The color of juveniles is similar to that of adults. These Water Snakes can be found in Florida.

Brown Watersnakes are commonly found throughout Florida’s mainland. They are not present in the Florida Keys. Non-venomous, they are not harmful to humans or pets. These snakes are not aggressive and prefer not to come into direct contact with humans or pets. Almost all bites occur when the snakes are purposely harmed.

Florida Cottonmouth In Florida

Scientific name of Florida Cottonmouth: Agkistrodon piscivorus conanti
Length: 30 – 48 inches
Venomous: Yes

The adult Florida water snake measures 30-48 inches (76-122 cm) in length. It has a large body with a pattern of light brown and dark brown crossbands with numerous dark dots and speckles. Adults may become uniformly black as the pattern darkens with age. A wide, black face stripe conceals the eye. Juvenile water snakes have a significantly lighter color pattern than adults and newborns have a sulfur-yellow tail tip.

Cottonmouths can be found in every county in Florida, as well as on numerous nearshore islands, including the Upper Florida Keys and various islands in Levy and Franklin counties in the Gulf of Mexico. These Water snakes in Florida can be found in every county as well, and their bites are also hazardous to humans and dogs.

The sufferer should seek emergency medical attention from a physician or institution that specializes in snakebites. Cottonmouths are not aggressive and avoid close contact with humans and animals. The majority of bites occur when snakes are purposefully harassed or unintentionally trodden on.

Saltmarsh Watersnake In Florida

Scientific name of Saltmarsh Watersnake: Nerodia clarkiiLength: 15 – 30 inches
Venomous: No

The average adult Saltmarsh Snake measures 15-30 inches (38-76 cm) in length. Their color patterns are quite varied and can be gray, grayish-olive, brown, tan, or rusty orange, with stripes or bands of dark color down the body. Juveniles have similar colors to adults. Water Snakes In Florida also display similar color patterns to adults.

These water snakes in Florida may be found in Florida along the majority of the state’s coastal boundary, from Volusia County in the north to Martin County in the south, along the western coast from Broward County west to Gulf County, and in Santa Rosa and Escambia Counties. They may also be found in the Florida Keys and on most barrier islands around the state. The Florida Museum does not have vouchered records of salt marsh snakes from the following coastal counties: Nassau, Duval, Saint Johns, Flagler, Palm Beach, Bay, or Walton.

Non-poisonous. Saltmarsh Snakes are not harmful to humans or pets, and they will typically avoid direct contact with humans and animals. Almost all bites occur when the snakes are purposely harmed.

Striped Crayfish Snake In Florida

Scientific name of Striped Crayfish Snake:Regina alleni

Length: 13 – 20 inches
Venomous: No

The average adult Striped Swampsnake measures 13-20 inches (33-51 cm) in length. They are dark brownish-yellow in color with three broad, black stripes along the back and one on each side. The lower sides are yellowish-tan in color. The head seems little in comparison to the body, yet the eyes are rather huge. The yellow lip scales contrast starkly with the brown hue of the skull. Juveniles are comparable to adults.

These snakes can be found throughout the Florida peninsula to the extreme eastern Panhandle. They are not found in the Florida Keys. Non-venomous, striped swamp snakes are not hazardous to humans or animals. Water snakes in Florida are a different species and are not native to Florida.

They are not found in the Florida Keys. Non-venomous, striped swamp snakes are not hazardous to humans or animals. Non-venomous, striped swamp snakes are not hazardous to humans or animals. Non-venomous, striped swamp snakes are not hazardous to humans or animals.

Florida Green Watersnake In Florida

Scientific name: Nerodia cyclopion
Length: 30-55 inches
Venomous: No

The average adult Florida Water Snake is 30-55 inches (76-140 cm) in length. They are greenish, brownish, or orangish in color, with no distinguishing characteristics except dark speckling. The head is big, with little scales separating the eye from the top lip scales. Juveniles are similar in color to adults. Water Snakes In Florida are also called Green Watersnakes.

Water Snakes in Florida may be found from the Florida Keys west to Walton County. They are not present in the western Panhandle counties of Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, and Holmes, and they have not been documented in the Florida Keys.

 Non-venomous. Although Florida Green Watersnakes are not hazardous to humans or pets, they will bite to protect themselves. These snakes are not aggressive and prefer not to come into direct contact with humans or pets. Almost all bites occur when the snakes are purposely harmed.

G​lossy Crayfish Snake In Florida

The scientific name of G​lossy Crayfish Snake: Regina rigida
Length: 14 to 24 inches
Venomous: No

The crayfish snakes are nearly never seen outside of the water, especially during severe rains. They enjoy wetlands, ponds, and canals to live in. Their primary food source is glossy crayfish, although they will also consume tiny fish and frogs. Glossy crayfish snakes in Florida devour their food alive rather than constricting it.

Black Swamp Snake In Florida

Scientific name: Seminatrix pygaea
Length: 10-15 inches
Venomous: No

One of the more common snakes throughout Florida can be found from the Florida peninsula to the Panhandle, as far west as Santa Rosa County’s Blackwater River State Forest. They can be found throughout the Florida Keys, as well, though they are not well-known there. Non-venomous. People and pets are not threatened by Black Swampsnakes. They are not venomous. Water Snakes In Florida.

Additional Resources on: Types Of Water Snakes In Florida

  1. Learn more about Midland Water Snake In Florida – Midland Watersnake – Florida Snake ID Guide
  2. Learn more about Florida Banded Water Snake – Florida banded water snake – Wikipedia
  3. Learn more about Plain-bellied Water Snake In Florida – Plain-bellied Watersnake – UF Wildlife Home

Explore the website to learn more about Different kinds of Water Snakes In Florida with pictures by:

1. pixabay.com 
2. pexels.com
3. flickr.com
3. google source
4. randomfunfactsonline.com
5. walkthroughco.com